GLT40

greater london tutors 40 anniversaryGreater London Tutors is proud to be celebrating its 40th year! As one of London’s longest running tuition agencies, founded in 1973, Greater London Tutors has been providing high quality tuition to families in London for the past 40 years.

To highlight this landmark year we will be running a number of celebratory activities with our various partners and clients. Please follow us on Twitter @london_tutors for regular updates on our events and special offers and use the #GLT40 when tweeting about us or any educational subjects.

Education Timeline

1972 – 2013

Greater London Tutors has been operating for 40 years and during that time the UK’s education system has seen a lot of radical changes with different Governments making their mark on the way the nations children are educated.

1972 – School leaving age raised to 16, which attracted opposition from teaching unions, chief police officers and even prominent politicians such as Nigel Lawson who argued there would be a surge of truancy and a rise in the juvenile crime rate if young people were made to stay at school a year longer.

Majority of Grammar schools closed in the 70s in the shift toward State Comprehensives.

1978 – Youth Opportunities Programme introduced helping 16 to 18 year olds find work.

1980 – Assisted Placed Scheme was introduced for those children who could not afford to go to independent schools, instead they were provided with free or subsided places.

1984 – O-levels replaced GCSEs. This was instigated by the education secretary at the time, Sir Keith Joseph. The first pupils to sit the exams were in 1988.

1988 – The Education Reform Act of 1988 designed by Kenneth Baker passed. This legislation allowed both Primary and Secondary schools to opt out of Local Authority Control and be funded by Central Government. Additionally, the National Curriculum was introduced in order to standardize the content taught across schools. In doing so, this shifted responsibility of what was taught away from teachers to central Government. The Standard Assessment Tests and Key stages were also introduced. Key stages were employed to make sure each child achieved certain educational objectives.

1998 – The Government, under Tony Blair, prevented the building of any more Grammar Schools. Historically the Labour Government has always strongly opposed the Grammar School selective ethos, believing that equality of opportunity requires all children to have the same standard of education.

2000 – City academies were introduced, a type of school which is independent of Local Education Authority control but is publicly funded.

2010 – The Academies Act 2010 was passed as part of the Coalition Government’s decision to expand the Academy programme. This Act allowed all state schools, both Primary and Secondary, to become Academies. The number of Academies has increased from 629 in April 2011 to 1,957 in July 2012.

GLT Timeline

old greater london tutor logo1973 – Greater London Tutorial Agency established in Southgate, North London, which incorporated the existing North London Tutorial Agency

old gtl logo2005 – Greater London Tutorial Agency changed management, moved offices to West London, and changed our name to Greater London Tutors

greater london tutors2008 – Greater London Tutors goes through a prolonged period of expansion due to an explosion in private tuition in London. This set the company in good stead for its re-brand in 2012.

2012 – Greater London Courses established as a sister company to Greater London Tutors


LATEST NEWS

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    We have comprised a list of the top 10 English exam revision tips, we believe can benefit you: Make sure you read the whole passage that a comprehension question relates to. Do not try and guess which parts of the text are the most relevant, as you are likely to end up missing something important […]

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